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M24LR discovery kit ready for battery free apps

19 Nov 2012  | Michael Markowitz

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STMicroelectronics has recently unveiled an easy-access development platform for its contactless memories with unique energy harvesting capabilities. The company's M24LR discovery kit contains tools necessary for designing battery-free electronic applications which can exchange data with ISO15693-compatible NFC-enabled smartphone or Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) reader-writers.

The turn-key development platform helps accelerate the creation and integration of energy-autonomous data collection, asset tracking or diagnostics capabilities in a wide variety of applications, including phone and tablet accessories, computer peripherals, electronic shelf labels, home appliances, industrial automation, sensing and monitoring systems, and personal healthcare products.

With its unique combination of industry-standard serial-bus (I2C) and contactless RF interfaces, ST's M24LR EEPROM memory has the ability to communicate with the host system 'over-the-wire' or 'over-the-air.' Furthermore, the M24LR's RF interface can convert ambient radio waves emitted by RFID reader-writers and NFC phones or tablets into energy to power its circuits and enable complete battery-free operation.

The M24LR Discovery Kit consists of two boards: an RF transceiver board with a 13.56MHz multi-protocol RFID/NFC transceiver (CR95HF) driven by an STM32 32bit microcontroller, which powers and communicates wirelessly with a battery-less board that includes ST's dual-interface EEPROM memory IC (M24LR), an ultra-low-power 8bit microcontroller (STM8L) and a temperature sensor (STTS75).

The M24LR Discovery Kit is sampling now, at the recommended resale price of $17.50.

The data sheet is available here




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