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WiFox boosts WiFi performance up to 700%

19 Nov 2012

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WiFox, a creation of NC State researchers, monitors the amount of WiFi channel traffic and grants an access point priority to send its data when it detects that a backlog of data is developing in that access point. The amount of backlog affects the level of priority given to an access point – a bigger backlog will result in higher priority assignment.

The research team tested the program on a real WiFi system in their lab, which can handle up to 45 users. They found that the more users on the system, the more the new program improved data throughput performance. Improvements ranged from 400 per cent with approximately 25 users to 700 per cent when there were around 45 users.

This translates to the WiFi system being able to respond to user requests an average of four times faster than a WiFi network that does not use WiFox.

"One of the nice things about this mechanism is that it can be packaged as a software update that can be incorporated into existing WiFi networks," says Arpit Gupta, a Ph.D. student in computer science at NC State and lead author of a paper describing the work. "WiFox can be incorporated without overhauling a system."




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