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Diode's integrated regulator transistors tolerate up to 100V

17 Jun 2013

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Diodes Incorporated has unveiled its monolithic integration of a transistor, Zener diode and resistor into a standard SOT89 package. With this integration, the ZXTR200x family of high-voltage regulators from Diodes Incorporated boosts power-circuit densities through reductions in component count and footprint. Principle applications for the devices are in networking, telecom and Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) where they are ideal voltage supply regulators for primary-side controllers in 48V DC-DC PSUs.

The ZXTR2005Z, ZXTR2008Z and ZXTR2012Z regulator transistors provide designers with high-voltage regulation by taking a nominal 48V input and generating fixed output voltages of 5V, 8V and 12V, where standard linear regulators cannot be used.

The line and load regulation capabilities within the devices safeguard continuous operation by preventing latch-up from transient voltage drops. Additionally, the unique structure allows the input to successfully tolerate spurious voltages up to a maximum of 100V, creating a safety margin in the event of transient over-voltage conditions.




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