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High voltage regulators boost power density

06 May 2014

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Diodes' regulators

Diodes Inc. has introduced a pair of high voltage linear regulators suiting 48Vdc power systems in telecom, networking, and Power-over-Ethernet equipment. Integrating several components into TO252-4 and PowerDI5060-8 packages, the ZXTR1005K4 and ZXTR1005PD8 help minimise circuit footprint while providing a fixed 5V (±2 per cent) output and a high drive capability of 50mA.

For high voltage regulation tasks, where industry standard linear regulators can't be used, the ZXTR1005 provides a cost-effective alternative that offers a significant improvement in supply reliability. The regulated 5V output enables microcontrollers to be powered from 48V telecom rails, while the devices' 100V tolerant inputs cope with any transient conditions.

The ZXTR1005's high performance line and load regulation capability also ensures transient voltage drops will not result in latch-up, thereby safeguarding continuous operation of the voltage supply. To simplify regulator control and aid diagnostics, the device includes an active high enable pin allowing the output to be toggled on and off.




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