Path: EDN Asia >> News Centre >> Consumer Electronics >> Anti-glare tech for mobile devices ready for scaling
Consumer Electronics Share print

Anti-glare tech for mobile devices ready for scaling

21 Jul 2014

Share this page with your friends

The proliferation of various mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets has, by far, failed to address a major issue when it comes to visual experience: glare. As such, a group of scientists has claimed to have developed a novel glass surface that cuts both glare and reflection, which continue to plague even the best mobile displays today.

Gadget glare

Gadget glare seems unavoidable, but a new kind of glass surface could be the answer. Credit: fatesun/iStock/Thinkstock

Valerio Pruneri and colleagues note that much effort has been poured into anti-reflective and anti-glare technology. In the highly competitive digital age, any bonus feature on a device gives it an edge. But for the most part, that hasn't included an integrated anti-glare, anti-reflective display. Users still typically have to dish out extra cash for a filter or film, some of questionable effectiveness, to lay on top of their glass screens so they can use the devices in bright light. One of the most promising developments involves layering anti-reflective nano-structures on top of an anti-glare surface. But the existing technique doesn't work well with glass, the material of choice for many electronic displays, so Pruneri's team at ICFO (The Institute of Photonic Sciences) in collaboration with Prantik Mazumder's team at Corning Inc. set out to find a new method.

On a very fine scale, they roughened a glass surface so it could scatter light and ward off glare but without hurting the glass' transparency. Then the researchers etched nano-size teeth into the surface to make it anti-reflective. In addition to achieving both of these visual traits, the researchers showed the textured surface repelled water, mimicking a lotus leaf. Although the anti-glare roughening protects the nano-size glass teeth, further research is needed to ensure that the surface can withstand heavy touchscreen use, they say. They add that the method is inexpensive and can easily be scaled up for industry use.




Want to more of this to be delivered to you for FREE?

Subscribe to EDN Asia alerts and receive the latest design ideas and product news in your inbox.

Got to make sure you're not a robot. Please enter the code displayed on the right.

Time to activate your subscription - it's easy!

We have sent an activate request to your registerd e-email. Simply click on the link to activate your subscription.

We're doing this to protect your privacy and ensure you successfully receive your e-mail alerts.


Add New Comment
Visitor (To avoid code verification, simply login or register with us. It is fast and free!)
*Verify code:
Tech Impact

Regional Roundup
Control this smart glass with the blink of an eye
K-Glass 2 detects users' eye movements to point the cursor to recognise computer icons or objects in the Internet, and uses winks for commands. The researchers call this interface the "i-Mouse."

GlobalFoundries extends grants to Singapore students
ARM, Tencent Games team up to improve mobile gaming


News | Products | Design Features | Regional Roundup | Tech Impact