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Bionic sensors control things using your feet

01 Sep 2014

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Boogio Bionic Foot Sensors, a wearable technology to activate any shoe into a smart shoe, announces the pre-sale of the Boogio developer kit. The Boogio developer kit empowers developers with a Bluetooth API for direct access to the sensor data and software for configuration and gesture mapping. Spawned from a team of engineers and scientists who build sensors for F-16s and other mission critical hardware, Boogio is a breakthrough in the world of wearable technology.

Boogio combines patent pending sensors capable of feeling 65,000 layers of gravitational force on your feet and also shows inner balance of your body and 3D movement of the feet in real-time. This technology delivers this data directly to mobile and connected devices.

"Boogio Bionic Foot Sensors are a set of ultra-thin sensory stickers and tiny computers that makes the shoes on your feet smart," said Jose Torres, Boogio CEO. "We distilled Boogio to the lightest and thinnest design so it becomes almost invisible when situated on your favourite pair of sneakers. We want to empower people's fashion and not interfere with personal style choices. We also designed the technology to be as hackable as possible to encourage experimentation."

Application of Boogio's technology targets three categories: gaming, diagnostics, and hands-free connectivity.

Boogio pairs with the Oculus Rift and other gaming devices, allowing for a hands-free, immersive virtual reality experience. It can also detect movements like dancing, jumping, and kicking and can score your foot movement for accuracy while working out or learning a new dance.

The device may also be used in pre- and post-surgery rehabilitation. Boogio provides feedback on muscle movements to help patients recover functionality over time. Its data can even help train muscles to perfect a jump shot or test balance for your golf swing. For those who run, it can provide feedback on gait and on how well you are running.

Finally, Boogio allows the user to control slideshow presentation by simply leaning left to right. Also, it can unlock a Bluetooth lock to open a door when carrying items with both hands.

Now available for pre-order, the Boogio developer kit is comprised of ultra-thin sensory stickers, three-axis accelerometers and three-axis gyroscopes in small Bluetooth-enabled clips, configuration software and two USB cables for a price of $189.

Each sensor has 65,000 layers of pressure sensitivity, so simple shifts of the body can be detected. As you move, Boogio is able to sense the pressure exerted in different parts of your foot, capturing high-fidelity feedback on a variety of movements, including steps, jumps, squats, and kicks. These sensory shoe accessories come in pairs on an open wearable platform and are compatible with Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android platforms.




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